The Tropical Hurricane Season 2020 in the Caribbean and Dominican Republic

The 2020 Tropical Hurricane Season officially started in the Atlantic Ocean on June 1st 2020 and will end on November 30th 2020, according to the World Meteorological Organization.

What to do during a hurricane ?

Hurricane Season 2019, Caribbean and Dominican Republic
This satellite picture is provided by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)

Last update on 06.09.20 at 1:50p.m.


Tropical Depression Cristobal

WATCHES AND WARNINGS

CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:

A Flash Flood Watch is in effect for:

  • Areas in and near the length of the Mississippi Valley

Wind Advisories are in effect for:

  • The Lower Mississippi Valley into Upper Great Lakes

A Gale Warning is in effect for:

  • Much of Lake Michigan
  • Portions of eastern Lake Superior
  • Portions of Lake Huron

At 700 AM CDT (1200 UTC), the center of Tropical Depression Cristobal was located near latitude 31.8 North, longitude 91.6 West. The depression is moving toward the north-northwest near 10 mph (17 km/h) and this motion should continue today. A turn toward the north is expected tonight, followed by a faster north-northeast motion Tuesday and Wednesday. On the forecast track, the center of Cristobal should move through northeastern Louisiana today, through Arkansas and eastern Missouri tonight and Tuesday, and reach Wisconsin and the western Great Lakes by Wednesday.

Maximum sustained winds are 35 mph (55 km/h) with higher gusts. Some weakening is expected through Tuesday. However, Cristobal is expected to strengthen some as it becomes an extratropical low Tuesday night and Wednesday.

Caribbean weatherThis satellite animation is offered by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)

Caribbean weatherThis satellite animation is offered by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)


Tropical Depression Cristobal

A non-tropical area of low pressure has formed over the central Atlantic Ocean a few hundred miles east of Bermuda. Development of this system as a subtropical cyclone appears unlikely due to unfavorable environmental conditions, and the low is expected to dissipate in a few days.

  • Formation chance through 48 hours, low, 10 percent
  • Formation chance through 5 days, low, 10 percent

Sector Dominican Republic and Porto Rico

Sector Dominican Republic and Porto RicoThis satellite animation is offered by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)

Sector Caribbean, Atlantic and Central America

Caribbean weatherThis satellite animation is offered by Accuweather.com (www.accuweather.com)

Sector Caribbean Visible Satellite Image

Caribbean weatherThis satellite animation is offered by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)

Sector Caribbean Infrared Satellite Image

Caribbean weatherThis satellite animation is offered by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)

Sector Caribbean Water Vapor Satellite Image

Satellite picture of the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean
This satellite picture is provided by weatherphotos.com (www.weatherphotos.com)

Hurricane’s Boulevard

Satellite picture of the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean
This satellite picture is provided by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)

Satellite picture of the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean
This satellite picture is provided by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)

Satellite picture of the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean
This satellite picture is provided by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)

Current Sea Surface Temperature Analysis

Satellite picture of the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean
This satellite picture is provided by noaa.com (www.noaa.com)

2019 Storms Archive

Satellite picture of the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean
This satellite picture is provided by wunderground.com (www.wunderground.com)

2020 Storms Archive

Satellite picture of the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean
This satellite picture is provided by wunderground.com (www.wunderground.com)

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Weather

Dominican Republic
& Puerto RicoThe weather live in Dominican Republic

20

Hurricanes for 2020

Arthur

Bertha

Cristobal

Dolly

Edouard

Fay

Gonzalo

Hanna

Isaias

Josephine

Kyle

Laura

Marco

Nana

Omar

Paulette

Rene

Sally

Teddy

Vicky

Wilfred

From 15 to 19 May

From 25 to 28 May

From 2 to ... June

Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale

Tropical Depression

Rainfall can cause serious damage and even flooding.

Tropical Storm

Heavy rains that can cause devastating floods. Strong winds that can generate tornadoes.

Hurricane Category 1 - 74-95 mph - 64-82 kt - 119–153 km/h

Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.

Hurricane Category 2 - 96-110 mph - 83-95 kt - 154–177 km/h

Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.

Hurricane Category 3 (major) - 111-129 mph - 96-112 kt - 178–209 km/h

Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.

Hurricane Category 4 (major) - 130-156 mph - 113-136 kt - 210–249 km/h

Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Hurricane Category 5 (major) - 157 mph or higher - 137 kt or higher - 250 km/h or higher

Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Cyclones and Hurricanes history in Dominican Republic, from 1615 till…

Hurricanes history